Meet the most famous supermodels of the 1960s

the most famous supermodels of the 1960s
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The sixties imprint on the twenty-first century. Whenever we intend to return to the memories of a beautiful time, we return to that era. Hence, they don’t call the ’60s for nothing; Amidst major social movements, the musical revolution, changing fashion trends, and with the emergence of a new group of fashion inspires who have redefined beauty and coined the term “fashionable.”

Names of fashion models who had a special impact in that era, so let’s get to know them:

  • Jean Shrimpton: Model among the first

Jean Shrimpton
Jean Shrimpton

As one of the world’s premier supermodels, Jane Shrimpton led the new wave of cover girls born from the Swinging London movement. Spotted by photographer David Bailey (with whom she had a 4-year relationship). In 1960 she was the star of countless fashion magazines, and she spread the mini-skirt fashion.

  • Veruschka: A bad scene that sets her fame

Veruschka
Veruschka

For German-born Veruschka, it was an infamous scene in the 1966 movie Blow-Up that made her reach world fame. Richard Avedon called her “the most beautiful woman in the world,” and she became one of the world’s highest-paid models. In 2010, 71-year-old Veruschka walked the runway during the Giles Spring 2011 show at Paris Fashion Week.

  • Twiggy: The Face of 1966

Twiggy
Twiggy

Twiggy was named “Public Face ’66” by the Daily Express at just 16 years old. Her signature look – a cropped haircut, spider lashes, and a boyish frame – was the epitome of the action that made her the cover star of every major magazine. She retired from modeling in 1970, but she remains a fashion icon to this day.

  • Donyale Luna: First Cover Girl of African Descent

Donyale Luna
Donyale Luna

 

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Donyale Luna was the world’s first African American cover girl. She was known for her glamorous 5ft 11in body and almond-shaped eyes. Also, she starred in several Andy Warhol movies. She tragically passed away from an accidental overdose at 34.

Pattie Boyd: The inspiration for rock songs

Pattie Boyd
Pattie Boyd

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pattie Boyd was the inspiration for two of rock-and-roll’s greatest hits: “Something” by The Beatles and “Layla” by Eric Clapton. She started her modeling career in 1962, being photographed by David Bailey and Terence Donovan’s likes. She met her future husband George Harrison when she was performing in A Hard Day’s Night.

  • Cybill Shepherd: Star of Successful TV Series

Cybill Shepherd
Cybill Shepherd

Before her remarkable role in “Moonlighting,” which she co-starred with star Bruce Willis, she won the Miss Modeling title at 16, as she was voted “Miss Teenage Memphis” in 1966, and won the “Model” award in 1968, making her a star. Fashion in this decade. Her 1970 cover of Glamor drew director Peter Bogdanovich to her breakout performance on The Last Picture Show.

  • Jean Patchett: 20 years in the modeling

Jean Patchett
Jean Patchett

Patchett is mostly known for her long 20-year career from late 1940 to the early 1960s. She was the base on the covers of Vogue of all time, and she was mostly known for being a “roving” model among those of that era’s warm and friendly models. A favorite of Irving Penn and Erwin Blumenfeld, Patchett was one of the earliest models.

Naomi Sims
Naomi Sims

There is no denying this: Naomi Sims is the first African American model. In the 1960s, after being rejected by agencies because of her race, Sims’ breakthrough came when she crossed the agency’s path and went straight to the paparazzi, covering the August 1967 edition of the New York Times fashion supplement. She was one of the first models to be signed to Wilhemina’s New Models and was the first black model to cover Ladies’ Home Journal and Life.

Benedetta Barzini
Benedetta Barzini

Barzini was spotted on the streets, but Diana Vreeland was the one who saw potential in Barzini, arranging for her to be photographed with famous photographer Irving Penn. Then, she was on the cover of the first issue of Vogue Italia, eventually joining the Andy Warhol Factory. She eventually retired from modeling to becoming a Marxist and Feminist Coordinator in Milan and is currently a professor at Urbino University in Milan.

Source: marieclaire+ yawmiyati

 

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